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With summer approaching, it’s essential for us redheads to stock up on our favorite sunscreen items. But, what if we told you your sunscreen wasn’t actually doing what it promises? It may come as a shock, but Consumer Reports just released a four-year study showing nearly half of chemical sunscreens aren’t doing their job — basically, they’re not giving you the amount of protection promised on the bottle. [Insert screaming emoji here]

Consumer Reports stated in their study, “This year we tested and rated more than 60 lotions, sprays, and sticks with SPF claims of 30 or higher–30 being the minimum level recommended by the American Academy of Dermatology. But 28 of them­–a full 43 percent–failed to meet the SPF claim on the label. Three of them fell far short, with our tests showing an SPF of less than 15.”

Consumer Reports reported the worst in the bunch were mineral (another word for natural) products.

Oh, and those water-resistant products you use when going for a swim? Yup, they aren’t doing their job either. The study discovered they to didn’t meet their SPF claim after immersed in water.

Consumer-Reports--Health-Inline-Can-you-trust-the-SPFNow, you may be wondering what sunscreens are bad, and which are good? According to a recent article from CBS News, the Banana Boat Kids Tear-Free, Sting-Free SPF 50 lotion and CVS Kids Sun Lotion SPF 50 both tested at an SPF 8.

SPF 8 for marketing that reads SPF 50?! This not good news for redheads.

Some of the top performers are listed below. Give them a round of applause, and they’ve been ‘Redhead Friendly’ tested & approved. They deserve it.

1. La Roche-Posay Anthelios 60 Melt-in Sunscreen Milk

2. Pure Sun Defense Disney Frozen SPF 50

3. Coppertone Water Babies SPF 50

4. No-Ad Sport SPF 50

5. Ocean Potion Protect & Nourish SPF 30

6. Aveeno Protect & Hydrate SPF 30

7. Equate Ultra Protection SPF 50

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) currently does not conduct their own tests. They only require the manufactures to test the products themselves. And, most companies do not even submit their results. We hope this changes in the near future, as we want to know [as redheads] that when we are protecting our skin we’re actually protecting it.

Next time you’re in the sunscreen aisle and deciding between a few different products, opt for the higher SPF and stick to the list above to make sure it’s doing its job. Rock it like a Redhead! 

See more redhead-friendly sunscreen recommendations in the “How to be a Redhead” book. Purchase your copy now!